Nursing home negligence suspected in Massachusetts

Recently, an 87-year-old patient was injured in a Massachusetts nursing home. The police report states that the patient suffers from dementia. It was noted that the patient had a laceration on her lip. The cause for the injury is suspected to be nursing home negligence.

The nursing home staff stated that the patient is unable to communicate with the staff due to severe dementia. A certified nurse assistant was supervising the woman during her breakfast feeding. According to the staff at the nursing home, the patient has a history of clamping down her jaw during meals. They also stated that this laceration on her lip was caused by clamping down.

A surprising fact noted in this case was that the woman’s injury was only reported to police after more than 24 hours. The nurse assistant is on administrative leave pending an investigation. Also, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health will file an elder abuse report for the concerned authorities.

Although family members try to choose the best nursing home for their loved one, incidents like this cannot always be predicted. Sometimes, nursing homes may be negligent in performing their duties. This negligence may prove costly for the loved one. An injury to a loved one may also cause mental trauma to the family members. Hence, it is important that the people responsible for injuries be held accountable for negligence and carelessness.

The family of the loved one can file a claim for compensation. The family may put in a claim for medical expenses, pain and suffering and mental trauma. It is advisable for the family to seek advice from a legal professional to be able to obtain the correct guidance in the matter. The professional may explain the various processes involved in the claim and help the family understand the various possible outcomes. The professional may also help in negotiating the correct compensation from the liable parties.

Source: Gloucester Times, “Gloucester Police/Fire: Nursing assistant on leave after injury at home,” Marjorie Nesin, Jan. 23, 2013