Posts tagged with "personal injury"

Wheelchair parked in front of a large picture window

Personal Injury Trial? – What to Expect

If you or a loved one has been injured in an accident in which another party, entity or organization could be at fault, you have the right to file a personal injury claim in order to receive the compensation you deserve. When seeking a consultation with a personal injury attorney in Massachusetts, the attorney will advise you as to whether or not you have a case.

In many situations, the other party may choose to settle the personal injury lawsuit out of court. However, there are also many instances in which the proposed settlement doesn’t seem fair, and insurance adjusters refuse to negotiate any further. At this time, you may decide that you prefer to take the case to trial. This is an important decision because a personal injury lawsuit that goes to trial can last anywhere from several days to several months, and possibly even longer than a year or two.

Your personal injury attorney can certainly advise you as to the best course of action, but it also helps to have a very good idea of what to expect at a personal injury trial. A lengthy process can sometimes be stressful and daunting, but with knowledge of what might happen if you choose to go to court, you’ll be better equipped to make an informed decision and limit any frustrating surprises.

What to Expect at the Beginning of a Personal Injury Trial

Unfortunately, the beginning of a personal injury trial isn’t very exciting, though there is a lot going on behind the scenes. Your attorney will be working diligently on your behalf to research all aspects of the case.

This involves visiting the scene of the accident, interviewing witnesses, taking photographs, and collecting and researching the police reports, medical records, witness statements, as well as conducting any additional investigation as deemed necessary to put together a strong case.

This process can typically take anywhere from one to six months. When all this has been completed, the personal injury lawsuit can be formally filed. The court then has a period of one to two months to serve the summons to the defendant, who then has 30 days to file a response. At this time, it is still possible to ask for a settlement, and many defendants may ultimately decide to settle in your favor than go to trial.

At the Start of the Personal Injury Trial

If a settlement is not agreed upon, the trial proceedings will continue. Both your lawyer and the defendant’s lawyers will send investigatory questions to each other regarding the facts of the case and the claims being made. Depending on how complex the case may be, this could take several months to complete.

It is also probable that the defense will require their own examination of your injuries or condition by a physician they appoint. The examination will be done in the presence of an attorney. At this time or shortly afterward, oral depositions occur in which witnesses and other individuals inherent to the case are interviewed by both sides. This can take a long time to prepare and complete — approximately three months.

If at this time, both sides cannot reach an amicable negotiation, the personal injury trial will proceed to go to court.

Preparing for Court in a Personal Injury Trial

The first step when proceeding to court for a personal injury lawsuit would be to select a jury. Both your attorney and the defense will conduct interviews with potential jurors. The jury selection process can take some time, unless, both sides manage to agree on jurors in a fairly quick manner.

When jury selection is complete, a date will be set for the beginning of the trial. Depending upon the complexity of the case, the trial can be over in as little as one day or as long as a few months. Both sides will have opening statements prepared, and then all involved parties and witnesses will be called to testify. Essentially, stories will be told as to how the accident occurred, how negligence on the part of the defendant was the cause, what injuries were sustained, and how those injuries will have affected your life or the life of a loved one.

Witnesses will also be called to testify, and the defense will be allowed to cross-examine them, as well as present their own experts or parties to attempt to expose any weaknesses or fallacies in your case.

Both sides will have a chance to call witnesses, cross-examine witnesses and experts, and then make closing arguments, leaving the verdict in the hands of the jury. At this point, your judgment is in the jury’s hands. However, if your case is just and you have chosen an experienced personal injury attorney to represent you in your lawsuit, it is possible to receive the compensation you deserve for your injuries, future medical treatment, lost wages, and other monetary losses due to the accident.

At the Boston law firm of Colucci Colucci Marcus & Flavin, PC, our attorneys help our clients recover the maximum possible compensation for their injuries. For a free initial consultation with one of our professional and experienced personal injury lawyers, call (617) 698-6000, or contact us online via our email form.

What to do if your child was injured on the school playground

What to do if your child was injured on the school playground

A playground is supposed to be a place where children can go and enjoy themselves while engaging in a range of activities on swing sets, slides, jungle gyms and other common recreational equipment. The interaction with other children while under the supervision of their parents is fun and beneficial, and playgrounds are also a great place for children to exercise and make friends.

However, as fun as the school playground might be, it is also a place where accidents can occur and where children can sustain injuries. Sometimes such an incident might be just an accident, but quite often it can be the result of negligence on the part of the school. The last thing you want to hear as a parent entrusting your child to a school’s care each day is that your child sustained an injury, especially if it is a serious one. Your child’s welfare is, of course, your main concern and should be the school’s as well.

School, city, and county playgrounds are supposed to be properly maintained in order to ensure safety for your children. The playground equipment should be in proper working order, and school playgrounds should be supervised at all times children are present. Negligent supervision, improperly maintained or manufactured equipment, damaged equipment, and unsafe grounds, in general, can put your child at risk for an injury.

If your child has been hurt at a school playground, as a result of negligence, improper supervision, defective equipment or improperly maintained equipment, you may be able to take legal action against the school district, an individual employed by the school or the school board.

Filing a Lawsuit Against a School for Injuries Sustained on a School Playground

There are many different scenarios that may give you the right to take legal action if your child sustained an injury on a school playground. These include:

  • Negligent supervision
  • Staff and/or teachers who have not been properly trained
  • Bad maintenance of grounds
  • A lack of proper security
  • Poorly maintained, poorly manufactured or damaged equipment
  • A failure to protect children against risks of foreseeable harm
  • A failure to repair defective equipment
  • An act of bullying that was not prevented

The school has a duty to ensure safety for all the children in and around a school playground. Failure to provide proper supervision or security and a safe environment can make the school legally liable for any injuries or accidents that occur on its playground. If your child has sustained an injury, it must be proven that the responsible party at the school acted in a negligent manner or failed to provide a safe and secure environment for the children.

If the injury was sustained as a result of an act of bullying, the offending child’s parents might also be held liable for the injury, as well as the school staff members who were negligent in preventing or stopping the incident of bullying.

Additionally, if the school is private, then there will likely be different parties or organizations that could ultimately be held responsible.

When seeking to file a claim, it is important that you speak with a lawyer who is experienced in playground injury cases. The attorney will know what questions to ask and what to investigate in order to find out who was ultimately responsible and whom the case should be filed against.

The playground injury lawyer will also investigate many of the facts of the case by traveling to the playground, inspecting the grounds and equipment, taking pictures, and building a case of evidence so that negligence or another cause of injury can be successfully proven, ensuring that you receive the compensation you need and deserve. Compensation can cover medical bills, pain and suffering, mental anguish, and any future medical bills or expenses for care that may be incurred as a result of the injury.

It is important to file a claim or lawsuit in a timely fashion, as cases such as this often have strict deadlines. Keep all records of the incident, including any photos you might have taken, notes on responses or communication with school staff and officials, any school or police reports, and medical paperwork and expenses. Having all this information organized and available will make it easier for the lawyer to file the necessary claim and paperwork in a timely fashion.

If your child has been injured at a school playground and you wish to know what your legal options might be and who might ultimately be held responsible, contact the experienced and professional attorneys at the Boston law firm of Colucci, Colucci, Marcus & Flavin, PC. You’ll find that our attorneys are experienced in cases involving school, city and county playground injuries and will fight hard for you to ensure that you receive the maximum possible compensation for your child’s injuries. For a free initial consultation with one of our seasoned personal injury lawyers, call us at (617) 698-6000, or get in touch with us via email.

What Should I Bring to My Personal Injury Case Initial Consultation

What Should I Bring to My Personal Injury Case Initial Consultation?

Suffering a serious injury can often be a traumatic experience, and in the days following the injury, you might experience anger, confusion, and stress. Take the time to get the rest you need and be sure to seek proper and thorough medical treatment. And once you are better able to think clearly, schedule an appointment for a consultation with a personal injury law firm.

Remember—experienced and professional personal injury attorneys will understand that you’ve been through a great deal. They also know that there is a way to lessen the stress. The number one thing you can do to ensure that a personal injury episode is not what defines you for the remainder of your life is to prepare for your personal injury case consultation. Simply follow these instructions and have the following items on hand for your initial consultation, and the process will go as smoothly and stress-free as possible.

Gathering Together Important Documents

Documents and records relating to the personal injury incident are of vital importance in your case and will serve to ensure you get the just compensation you deserve. Your first step in preparing for your personal injury case consultation is to gather together all the necessary documents.

Medical Records

Any medical records pertaining to your injury should be collected from the facilities you have visited for examination or treatment. You have a right to have copies of all your medical records—if they haven’t already been provided to you, you need only ask, and might possibly be required to sign a release form.

As medical records are often the basis for whether or not you have a substantial case, they are probably the most important documents you will need. The medical records will contain details of the medical provider or facilities you have been to, what help was provided, how much your care cost and the contact information for the professionals who administered treatment or oversaw your examinations.

The extent of your injuries and the cost of your care, as well as any possible costs for future care if needed, will serve to determine the strength of your case and what compensation you may be entitled to.

Police Reports

If police were called to the scene, you will also want to obtain a copy of the police report to bring to your personal injury consultation. The police report may contain important details pertaining to the incident that you are unaware of.

Receipts

If, as a result of your injury, you needed to purchase specific items (medical equipment, prescription pills, special clothing or items needed for in-home care) you should also bring the receipts for those items in order to claim them as additional expenses.

Paystubs

If your injury has caused you to miss work, your paystubs can show the financial loss you have suffered, which can also be used to strengthen your claim as well as recoup lost monies.

Records of Correspondence With Other Parties Involved

If there were other individuals involved when you suffered your injury and you have records of related correspondence, you should bring those as well. These can be emails, text messages, voicemail messages, legal documents that you were served by the other party, letters that were written, and even messages sent over social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter.

 

Preparing Your Own Notes and Documents

In addition to the above, you will want to be prepared with your own documents. These will include:

A Written Timeline of the Events

Write down everything you remember about the event—what time it occurred, where it occurred, the reason why the injury occurred, who was there, etc. All the details and circumstances surrounding the incident are very important when your attorney attempts to prove another party is at fault for your personal injury.

Photographs and Evidence

If possible, bring photographs of the area and any evidence relating to your case. Photographs and evidence can help prove that an area was unsafe, for example, or can help to corroborate your story if there is no police report. Your attorney will also gather their own photographs and evidence, but having your provisions early on will ensure that nothing is overlooked, especially if the scene is changed before the attorney visits it.

Any of Your Own Questions

You are likely to have plenty of your own questions. Write them down so that you are sure not to forget any of them on the day of your personal injury consultation. Asking questions will also give you a better feel for the attorney and help you to make an informed decision as to which attorney you would like to represent you in your personal injury case.

Contact us

At the Boston law firm of Colucci Colucci Marcus & Flavin, PC, our attorneys will help our clients recover the maximum possible compensation for their injuries. For a free initial consultation with one of our professional and experienced personal injury lawyers, call (617) 698-6000, or contact us online via our email form.

Product Liability Problems: When Healing Becomes Hurting

We’re in the middle of a cold New England winter and for many of us, that means we’re suffering the ubiquitous head cold. Not surprisingly, young children are particularly susceptible as their attendance in school subjects them to throngs of other children, many of whom are infected with a virus.

As parents, we seek to do all that we can to alleviate the unpleasantness experienced by our children when they are ill. Care must be taken, however, to ensure that our well-meaning efforts don’t create a bigger problem. Unfortunately, some of the products we buy are not designed with safety in mind and the devices we use to help our children can end up harming them.

For example, we recently represented a two-year-old girl who had previously developed symptoms of ordinary congestion. Her primary care doctor recommended she use a warm steam vaporizer. The girl’s parents purchased the defendant’s vaporizer, which contained warnings to keep the apparatus away from children. Even still, the parents placed the vaporizer on the child’s floor at bedtime.

The unit was equipped with a glowing orange night light that, the manufacturer advertised, promoted “safety.” The child unexpectedly woke in the middle of the night to notice a strange, glowing orange orb on her floor. When she approached closely to investigate, a burst of steam emanated from the vaporizer and scalded her face. She was left with a visible and permanent scar under her eye.

What Made This a Product Liability Case?

We hired an MIT engineer who tested the unit and opined that it emitted an exceedingly hot plume of steam which can disfigure upon only “momentary contact.” The expert also noted that the steam exhausted by the vaporizer should not have exceeded 160 degrees Fahrenheit, and should also have been equipped with a guard that would have diffused the scalding steam.

This device was not designed with personal safety in mind, and as a result, an innocent child was hurt. That’s the most heartbreaking aspect of product liability cases – the harm could easily be prevented if the company that made the device had just taken simple steps to ensure safety.

During several years of litigation, the manufacturer denied any responsibility only to ultimately settle the case with us for nearly $2 million.

The moral of the story is that sometimes products that we routinely purchase are not what they appear. Care must be taken to ensure that any such product can be used safely. This is particularly true if the product is being used around small children.

Protecting Your Family

If you or someone you know has been hurt because of a flawed product, give us a call at 1 (888) 330-6657 or contact us and we can talk to you about your options.

Slip and Fall on Ice – Who is liable?

Slip and fall cases are one of the first scenarios the general public thinks about when they think of a lawsuit. A person walks into a business and slips on a patch of ice in the parking lot and is hurt on impact.

These cases are always premise liability cases, where a personal injury occurred because of a dangerous condition at a physical location.

However, we always stress to our clients that the liable party in a case is not always obvious. There may be multiple potential defendants that could be involved, such as the business where the injury occurred, the owner of the property, or the snow removal company that failed to clear away the ice.

 

Recent Developments

There is some good news for people who were hurt in a winter time slip and fall in Massachusetts: The laws got friendly to plaintiffs a few aears ago and businesses can no longer get away with not touching snow on their property.

Massachusetts used to give property owners a pass for not clearing snow and ice on their property. They would hold businesses liable if the snow and ice had been disturbed, such as with footprints, tire tracks or shovel marks, but anyone who stepped on virgin snow did so at their own risk. This was called “natural accumulation.”

In 2010 the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court threw out the natural accumulation rule in the case Papadopoulos v. Target Corp. where a customer of the Target retail store in Danvers fell on a chunk of ice that was near his car. The court opinion stated:

“It is not reasonable for a property owner to leave snow or ice on a walkway where it is reasonable to expect that a hardy New England visitor would choose to risk crossing the snow or ice rather than turn back or attempt an equally or more perilous walk around it.”

Because of that ruling, businesses in Massachusetts are now required to keep the walkways and parking lots around their locations clear of snow and ice for the safety of the public.

 

Protecting Your Family

If you or someone you know has been hurt because of a negligent property owner, give us a call at 1 (888) 330-6657 or contact us and we can talk to you about your options.

 

 

Dino M. Colucci named one of The Best Lawyers in America

We’re proud to announce that our own Dino M. Colucci has been selected to appear in the 2017 edition of “The Best Lawyers in America®” legal referral guide.

The Best Lawyers in America®” exists to help members of the public find the top lawyers in their area. Established attorneys are asked if they had to choose an attorney to represent themselves, their colleagues or their loved ones, who would they want in their corner.

“I’m grateful to receive this award and accept it on behalf of everyone at our firm who works tirelessly to help the clients we’re honored to represent,” said Dino M. Colucci.

Lawyers can not vote for themselves, partners or family members. The honor is based on merit and attorneys do not pay any sort of fee to appear in the listing.

This will be the 23rd edition of the publication and Dino M. Colucci is listed in the section for personal injury litigation. The first edition of “The Best Lawyers in America®” was published in 1983.

Good work Dino, we’re glad to have your name out in front on our shingle.

 

No lawsuit can happen without these three components, no matter how terrible the conduct of the people involved.

No matter how outrageous a defendant’s conduct may be, there’s one thing you can never sue for:

Picture this: A person is walking down the sidewalk, enjoying a warm Spring day, when out of nowhere a drunk driver hops the curb and strikes them over from behind. The pedestrian flies through the air, lands on his feet and finds himself to be completely unharmed. A miracle occurred, as most people would have been permanently injured or killed.

On what grounds can that pedestrian, unharmed only by a stroke of luck, sue that driver, who clearly acted negligently and was at fault for what happened.

The answer is, none. There is no chance of a lawsuit here. The pedestrian does not have a case.

Why? Because you can’t sue for what could have happened, only what did happen. In this case, no one was injured.

Lawsuits aren’t some kind of bad luck lottery ticket, where people profit off of their own misfortune. No, personal injury lawsuits are about compensating people for their suffering and to help them adjust to life-changing events.


The three elements of a lawsuit

A lawsuit requires liability, causation, and damages. In this example, the driver was liable for what happened as he got behind the wheel of a car while intoxicated, which is a clear case of negligent behavior. He is also the one who caused the pedestrian to be struck, it wasn’t a faulty steering wheel or other mechanical problem. Both of those elements are required for a case, but so is damages. In this example, there were no damages as no one was injured.

Sometimes people say things like “I could have been killed.” They rightly find themselves shocked by how terribly things could have gone because of someone else’s bad behavior. Those issues shouldn’t be ignored. There may be some kind of legal consequence that will fall on the person who caused that problem. However, a lawsuit is not the solution for things that could have happened but didn’t.

‘Reckless’ chase by local police at core of $2.5M case

The following was originally published in the Dec. 2, 2007 issue of Rhode Island Lawyers Weekly. It has been reprinted with permission.

On the night of Feb. 19, 2004, the driver of a gold Ford Taurus was identied by a Providence police officer as a member of a local gang. A chase ensued but was quickly terminated by the police when it became apparent that the driver was determined not to stop.

The motorist crossed into Cranston where a police officer in that community began pursuing the Taurus. The chase escalated to the point that four police cruisers were traveling behind the suspect, who was observed driving south on Route 9S at a high rate of speed and with his headlights off. At one point, he was seen making a quick U-turn and then driving the wrong way into oncoming traffic; three of the pursuing police officers reportedly did likewise.

The suspect proceeded onto Route 10, again traveling the wrong way and still trailed by several police cruisers, and drove his car headlong into a vehicle being driven by Natasha Valley, a Cranston resident and mother of three who was returning home from training to become an emergency medical technician. Last month, a settlement was reached in which Valley, 29, now a paraplegic, is to receive $2.5 million. Lawyers Weekly reporter Barbara Rabinovitz spoke last week with Milton, Mass., attorney Dino M. Colucci about how he achieved that result for his client.

Q.You say that the central question in the case was whether your client could prove that the defendants – the city of Cranston and the individual police officers involved – were reckless, not merely negligent. Given the dramatic testimony that was taken in deposition, was this a challenge for you or a slam dunk?

A. It wasn’t by any stretch a slam dunk. In fact, before we took the case, several law rms had turned her away because they didn’t believe such a suit could be successfully maintained. In honesty, we took the case on faith in the hope that we could make something good come out of such a tragic set of circumstances …. Fourteen depositions were taken; we obtained broadcasts of the police communications that night as well as their [police-chase l training policy. e suspect that they were chasing was eventually apprehended, and we went to jail to try to interview him. We were actually able to meet with him for 15 minutes in a holding cell to get whatever information he was willing to impart to us.

Q. Rhode Island has a $100,000 cap on recoveries for police negligence. Would that have applied in this case? What would have been your strategy for getting around it?

A. It was an open question as to whether or not the cap would apply once all the evidence was presented at trial. The burden would have been entirely ours to prove – that the conduct of the Cranston Police Department rose to a sufficient level of recklessness – in order to avoid the cap …. The city [of Cranston] continues to maintain that they did nothing wrong; they’re not accepting liability in any sense.

Q. You say that this may be the first case to apply the law established in the May 2005 case of Seide v. The State of Rhode Island, which permits citizens to bring actions against a police department for violations of a police-chase policy. Could you have achieved the same result without the Seide decision?

A. It was fortuitous for us that that case was decided by the Supreme Court of Rhode Island about six months after we took Natasha Valley’s case [in December 2004]. We took it in hopes that we could set a precedent given the facts in our case. is may be the first application of that decision … that the lower court’s decision to dismiss the case was incorrect.

Q. You’ve said that several law rms had declined to represent your client, in the belief that such a claim could not be successfully maintained. Why did you take the case in the end?

A. First and foremost, we felt great empathy for this woman. She was a young woman with three kids and, through no fault of her own, she found herself a paraplegic. Secondly, she’s a very inspiring woman. While most people would sit around and feel self-pity about their situation, she was so optimistic about her future and the life that she wanted for her kids that it was inspiring for us. So, we couldn’t walk away.

Q. What has this case accomplished with regard to police chases?

A. It won’t set a precedent because we mediated the case and reached a settlement, so nothing’s been adjudicated …. In my experience, every case really needs to be examined on its own merits. The police have a very difficult job, and we’re sensitive to that. Very often they find themselves in the midst of chaos, and they have to make immediate judgments on what to do. But Cranston had a [vehicle-chase] policy that was formulated years before this accident, and it was our position that this policy served as a foundation, or a guideline, so that officers can apply the logic contained in the policy when they’re out amidst the chaos. And we don’t believe that was done here.

Q. You gathered quite a bit of evidence for the mediation – an interactive audio- visual program, which synthesized an animated map of the chase route, broadcasts from the police, photos of the collision and so forth. Do you think that was instrumental in getting the defendants to settle?

A. I do. In my opinion, it synthesized many of the critical points that served as the foundation of our case. It brought together, in dramatic fashion, the conduct of the police, the route that they took in pursuing the suspect.

We were able to hear their actual broadcasts, and we were able to see the relevant portions of the Cranston chase policy. And in my opinion, the juxtaposition of these various elements really bolstered our case …. These were experienced [defense] lawyers we were dealing with; they did a good job for their clients. But I thought that the audio-visual portion of the case had very real impact.

Q. Where is your client now, and what is her condition?

A. She’s still in Cranston. She’s confined to a wheelchair. She’s the mother of three and a very nice woman, and I’m just very pleased that her future will be at least a little less uncertain.

Crosswalk accidents don't always turn out how you first thing. Always take down their information

Always play it safe after you’ve been hurt

I was speaking to a client yesterday and he told me that his mother was hit by a car while in a crosswalk. He then told me that she never took down any information from the driver because she “ didn’t think she was hurt badly.”

It’s now been several months and she very much regrets that decision because her pain an limitation has gotten progressively worse.

This happens often and I have a theory on it: I think that when someone is involved in an accident their adrenaline is pumping and the first thing we as humans do is take a quick inventory. In other words: Am I bleeding; did I break anything; can I walk; etc. If all seems well, we want to ignore what just happened and hope that everything is ok.

The truth is that you really don’t know what you will ultimate feel. Once the adrenaline subsides and the you relax pain and problem often sets in. Even then, people think that they’re just sore and it will pass. But it’s very difficult to discern between expected soreness and injury.

The best thing to do in these situations is to be on the safe side. Just jot down the other person’s name, address, phone number, and license plate (provided it’s a car accident). If you go home and truly do feel ok, go about your life and thank God that it wasn’t more serious. But if you do wind up feeling badly or learn that you actually were injured, you’ll be in a better position to pursue due compensation.

Bicycle safety is much easier when you pay attention to your surroundings

Bicycle safety is everyone’s responsibility

Now that the nice weather is returning, the streets will again soon be filled with bicyclists who are out to get fresh air and/or get back in shape.  Biking is more popular than ever.  One study reveals that between 2000 and 2009, the number of bike commuters grew 70% across the entire United States.

Returning to an outdoor lifestyle after enduring a typically frigid New England winter is a special if fleeting experience.  As any New Englander knows, a return to the outdoors is something that is treasured and earned with patience and endurance during the many cold, dark days that preceded.  You’ll want to ensure that you are safe as you enjoy the return of summer and by observing a few simple tips, you can increase your odds

  1. Most experts agree that bicyclists should alwayswear a helmet.  Your chances of surviving an accident are exponentially increased if you take care to wear a safety helmet.  Today, there are many to choose from .  You should do some preliminary research before you buy.  You should hold your vanity in check.  Remember that the helmet that looks best on you may not necessarily be the safest.
  1. Bike on the road in the same direction as traffic.  Bicycles are considered “vehicles” and are usually expected to observe the same traffic controls as cars.  This means you need to “stop” at a stop sign, etc.
  1. Whenever possible, get off the beaten path.  You’ll find that the beauty of your surroundings increases proportionally to the decrease in traffic.
  1. Make sure your bicycle is equippedwith a light, a mirror, a bell and a water bottle.  The light will increase your visibility; the mirror will allow you to see vehicles that are approaching your position; the bell will remind those traveling in proximity that you are nearby; and the water will keep you hydrated on those humid New England days.
  1. Refrain from wearing headphones.  You should use all of  your senses while biking.
  1. Be aware that even motorists who make active use of their mirrors still have to contend with blind spots. Avoid finding yourself in an area where a motorist can’t see you.
  1. Wear bright, reflective clothing and bike in a straight, predictable path.  The more steady and visible you are, the less likely you are to be in a collision.
  1. Don’t become distracted by your phone.  Texting or prolonged talking while biking is a recipe for disaster.
  1. Learn and use hand signals.  Like driving a car, you want to “telegraph” what your intentions are before you actually turn.
  1. Make sure your bicycle is in good repair. It is wise to have your bike “tuned up” at the end of the biking season to make sure that everything is working as it should.

Observing these simple tips will keep you safe, enhance your biking experience and give you piece of mind.